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GOING BEYOND RECALL NOTICE :

THANKS FOR STAYING TUNED  



As discussed in last month’s Gazette, the “Huge GM Recall” further information is warranted.  For 40 years the Federal Government has operated the recall system to bring in defective vehicles for free safety-related repairs.  But common problems that aren’t considered to be safety issues, ranging from peeling paint to serious mechanical flaws, usually aren’t announced to the public.  Usually they are addressed in technical service bulletins (TSBs), which automakers send to their dealers’ service departments to tell mechanics how to perform the repairs.  But sometimes a problem cited in a TSB is a safety issue, as was the failure of GM’s ignition switches.  This problem has been linked to 13 deaths going back several years.  So be aware of any TSBs related to your corvette or family auto.



WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:  

RECALLS + If you get a recall notice, be sure to act on it as soon as you can.  You can contact the dealer to make an appointment or find out when parts will be ready to make the repair. + Follow the advice in the recall notice.  For example, in the GM case, the company recommended using only the vehicle key in the ignition but not a key chain with other keys attached.  + Sometimes carmakers will remedy a problem without initiating a formal recall by conducting service actions.  As with recalls, the company will contact you directly about how to have a problem fixed at a dealer.  



TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS (TSB)   + A TSB indicates the automaker is aware of a common problem, but it doesn’t mean the manufacturer will pay for the repair.  But it can help isolate a specific problem.  In some cases, you might be able to use it to negotiate a price break.  + You can search for summaries of bulletins at the website of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, at nhtsa.gov.  Once you locate the bulletins related to your vehicle, you can order the full texts free.  



REPORT A SAFETY PROBLEM   TO REPORT A SAFETY PROBLEM YOU HAVE EXPERIENCED. YOU CAN REPORT IT ON NHTSA’s HOTLINE:  888-327-4236.  YOU WILL NEED TO PROVIDE INFORMATION SUCH AS MAKE, MODEL, YEAR, AND THE VIN.  THE DATE OF MANUFACTURE CAN ALSO HELP.  IN ADDITION, YOU CAN ALSO MAKE A REPORT THROUGH SaferCar.gov.  


STAY SAFE